Consider a VPN client such as Palo Alto GlobalProtect doing split tunneling with an include access route of 10.4.0.0/16, 10.5.0.0/16, and 10.6.0.0/16.  The client route table in Windows looks like this, as expected:

C:\Users\harold>route print

IPv4 Route Table
=======================================================================
Active Routes:
Network Destination Netmask Gateway Interface Metric
10.4.0.0 255.255.0.0 On-link 10.4.1.205 1
10.5.0.0 255.255.0.0 On-link 10.4.1.205 1
10.6.0.0 255.255.0.0 On-link 10.4.1.205 1

The user then connects to a AnyConnect VPN with a split tunnel include of 10.0.0.0/8.  Something rather funny happens!

C:\Users\harold>route print

IPv4 Route Table
=======================================================================
Active Routes:
Network Destination Netmask Gateway Interface Metric
10.4.0.0 255.255.0.0 On-link 10.4.1.205 1
10.4.0.0 255.255.0.0 10.8.2.1 10.8.2.27 2
10.5.0.0 255.255.0.0 On-link 10.4.1.205 1
10.5.0.0 255.255.0.0 10.8.2.1 10.8.2.27 2
10.6.0.0 255.255.0.0 On-link 10.4.1.205 1
10.6.0.0 255.255.0.0 10.8.2.1 10.8.2.27 2

AnyConnect has created duplicate routes…for routes that don’t even belong to it.  But since the metric is a higher value (2 vs. 1) these routes are ignored by Windows.  So, no harm no foul I guess?

Different story on Mac though…hmmm

 

 

 

sadf

 

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