Just like “crypto isakmp policy”, the “crypto ikev2 policy” configuration is global and cannot be specified on a per-peer basis.  If there’s a mismatch, “debug crypto ikev2 error” will show something like this:

IKEv2-ERROR:(SESSION ID = 685,SA ID = 1):Expected Policies: : Failed to find a matching policyProposal 1: AES-CBC-128 SHA256 SHA256 DH_GROUP_2048_MODP/Group 14

There are two solutions.  The simplest is specify all possible encryption, integrity, and PFS parameters in a single proposal:

crypto ikev2 proposal MY_IKEV2_PROPOSAL 
 encryption aes-cbc-256 aes-cbc-192 aes-cbc-128 3des
 integrity sha512 sha384 sha256 sha1
 group 14 5 2

crypto ikev2 policy MY_IKEV2_POLICY 
 proposal MY_IKEV2_PROPOSAL

Alternately, write separate proposals, then list them in the policy by preference:

crypto ikev2 proposal HIGH 
 encryption aes-cbc-256 aes-cbc-192 aes-cbc-128 
 integrity sha512 sha384 sha256 
 group 16 14
crypto ikev2 proposal MEDIUM
 encryption aes-cbc-256 aes-cbc-192 aes-cbc-128 
 integrity sha256 sha1
 group 14 5
crypto ikev2 proposal LOW 
 encryption aes-cbc-128 3des
 integrity sha1 md5
 group 2
crypto ikev2 policy MY_IKEV2_POLICY 
 proposal HIGH
 proposal MEDIUM
 proposal LOW

I am disappointed Cisco did not design things so policies could be associated with individual peers.   Imagine a router terminating VPNs to different business partners, where Partner A insists on AES256/SHA512/Group16, while Partner B is still doing 3DES/MD5/Group2.  You would write the policy with the most secure at the top, but there’s nothing to stop partner A from downgrading to partner B’s policy.  It’s a security concern, plus takes extra time to negotiate.

Palo Alto Firewalls supports different ISAKMP policies on a per-IKE gateway basis and it’s one of the reasons I’ve really preferred them for Site-to-Site VPNs over the years.